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 Post subject: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 7:45 pm 

Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2013 2:39 pm
Posts: 312
Just being nosy: where does this 86% for the attack time stem from?
Usually it's 63% = 1 - 1/e. Is it 1 - 1/e^2 here or something completely different and why?


Last edited by \_/ on Sat Mar 07, 2015 9:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 8:20 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 17, 2009 2:56 pm
Posts: 3574
Quote:
Because increasing time has a diminishing effect on gain for compressors, it is practical to specify attack as the time required for gain to settle to a defined percent of final value. Typical are 86% or 95% of the final value.
http://www.rane.com/note155.html

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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 8:35 pm 
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Posts: 231
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Whoaaa! Bojcha, this is what I've been looking for! :D


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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sat Mar 07, 2015 10:15 pm 

Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2013 2:39 pm
Posts: 312
What I meant was where these numbers come from, what's there motivation? They look a lot like this RC capacitor voltage response:
Image


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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 12:40 am 
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I actually have no idea. I read descriptions of these numbers being more or less a standard so I used them...


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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 7:44 am 

Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2013 2:39 pm
Posts: 312
Now I'm stunned. But ST is still using an exponential function, i.e. to reach 86% needs two times as long as reaching 63%, correct?


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 Post subject: Re: attack percentage
PostPosted: Sun Mar 08, 2015 2:12 pm 
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Probably, yes. If you're not using things like Inertia.


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